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Mintzbergs managerial roles essay topics

Mintzbergs Managerial Roles Essay Topics

Mintzbergs managerial roles essay topics

The three levels of management in an organization are First-Line Managers, Middle Managers and Top Managers. Three primary tasks of First-line managers include responsibility for the production of goods or delivery of services, supervision of employees in their everyday tasks and leading employees who do the actual work. Essays & Papers Ten Managerial Roles as Identified by Mintzberg Essay Ten Managerial Roles as Identified by Mintzberg Essay 2. 1Ten managerial roles as identified by Mintzberg Managerial roles define behaviors and traits certain managers possess. A liaison is the center for information and communication networks, and maintains external contacts to gather information (“Mintzberg: The Managerial Roles”). The next set of roles is called information processing roles. The first information processing role is a monitor. A monitor gathers external as well as internal information relevant to the organization. Mintzberg managerial roles Essay Sample During early part of the twentieth century, Henri Fayol French industrialist proposed that all managers perform five management activities that are: plan, organize, command, coordinate, and control. Definition of Management and Managerial Roles Words | 7 Pages organization is the main resource that is needed by a manager to manage other resources in operating an organization, which indicates that a large proportion of management work is done through people of the organization.

Download Essay Get Full Essay Get access to this section to get all the help you need with your essay and educational goals. Get Access Mintzberg managerial roles Essay Sample During early part of the twentieth century, Henri Fayol French industrialist proposed that all managers perform five management activities that are: But nowadays there management functions have been condensed to four: Managers exist in every business.

In fact, managers do the same types of tasks in all businesses. Each component is important and one cannot function well without the others. While drawing from a variety of academic disciplines, and to help managers respond to the challenge of creative problem solving, principles of management have long been categorized into the four major functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling the P-O-L-C framework.

The four functions, summarized in the P-O-L-C figure, are actually highly integrated when carried out in the day-to-day realities of running an organization. Therefore, you should not get caught up in trying to analyze and understand a complete, clear rationale for categorizing skills and practices that compose the whole of the P-O-L-C framework. It is important to note that this framework is not without criticism.

Specifically, these criticisms stem from the observation that the P-O-L-C functions might be ideal but that they do not accurately depict the day-to-day actions of actual managers.

However, the general conclusion seems to be that the P-O-L-C functions of management still provide a very useful way of classifying the activities managers engage in as they attempt to achieve organizational goals.

Planning The first component of managing is planning. A manager must determine what the organizations goals are and how to achieve those goals. Setting objectives for the goal and following up on the execution of the plan are two critical components of the planning function.

For example, a manager of a new local restaurant will need to have a marketing plan, a hiring plan and a sales plan. Planning is the function of management that involves setting objectives and determining a course of action for achieving those objectives. Planning requires that managers be aware of environmental conditions facing their organization and forecast future conditions.

It also requires that managers be good decision makers. Planning is a process consisting of several steps. The process begins with environmental scanning which simply means that planners must be aware of the critical contingencies facing their organization in terms of economic conditions, their competitors, and their customers.

Mintzberg managerial roles Essay Sample

Planners must then attempt to forecast future conditions. These forecasts form the basis for planning. Planners must establish objectives, which are statements of what needs to be achieved and when. Planners must then identify alternative courses of action for achieving objectives.

After evaluating the various alternatives, planners must make decisions about the best courses of action for achieving objectives. They must then formulate necessary steps and ensure effective implementation of plans.

Mintzbergs managerial roles essay topics

Finally, planners must constantly evaluate the success of their plans and take corrective action when necessary. There are many different types of plans and planning. Strategic planning involves analyzing competitive opportunities and threats, as well as the strengths and weaknesses of the organization, and then determining how to position the organization to compete effectively in their environment.

Strategic planning has a long time frame, often three years or more. Strategic planning generally includes the entire organization and includes formulation of objectives. Tactical planning is intermediate-range one to three years planning that is designed to develop relatively concrete and specific means to implement the strategic plan. Middle-level managers often engage in tactical planning.

Operational planning generally assumes the existence of organization-wide or subunit goals and objectives and specifies ways to achieve them. Planning is the foundation pillar of management. It is the base upon which all other areas of management are built. Planning requires administration to assess where the company presently is and where it would be in the coming years. Planning is an unending course of action.

Ten Managerial Roles as Identified by Mintzberg Essay

There may be sudden strategies required to be implemented during a crisis. There are external factors that constantly affect a company, both positively and negatively.

Depending on the conditions, a company may have to alter its course of action regarding certain goals. This kind of preparation or arrangement is known as strategic planning.

In strategic planning, management analyzes internal and external factors that may affect the company, its objectives and goals. One of the primary tools of strategic planning is the use of SWOT Analysis, a technique that helps organizations find their strengths and weaknesses, identify areas of opportunity and take preventive measures against threats arising from both internal and external environmental factors. Organizing Managers are responsible for organization of the company and this includes organizing people and resources.

Knowing how many employees are needed for particular shifts can be critical to the success of a company. If those employees do not have the necessary resources to complete their jobs, organization has not occurred.

Organizing is the function of management that involves developing an organizational structure and allocating human resources to ensure the accomplishment of objectives. The structure of the organization is the framework within which effort is coordinated. The structure is usually represented by an organization chart, which provides a graphic representation of the chain of command within an organization. Decisions made about the structure of an organization are generally referred to as organizational design decisions.

Organizing also involves the design of individual jobs within the organization. Organizing at the level of the organization involves deciding how best to departmentalize, or cluster, jobs into departments to coordinate effort effectively.

There are many different ways to departmentalize, including organizing by function, product, geography, or customer. Many larger organizations use multiple methods of departmentalization. Organizing at the level of a particular job involves how best to design individual jobs to most effectively use human resources. Traditionally, job designwas based on principles of division of labor and specialization, which assumed that the more narrow the job content, the more proficient the individual performing the job could become.

However, experience has shown that it is possible for jobs to become too narrow and specialized. For example, how would you like to screw lids on jars one day after another, as you might have done many decades ago if you worked in company that made and sold jellies and jams?

When this happens, negative outcomes result, including decreased job satisfaction and organizational commitment, increased absenteeism, and turnover. Recently, many organizations have attempted to strike a balance between the need for worker specialization and the need for workers to have jobs that entail variety and autonomy.

Many jobs are now designed based on such principles as empowerment, job enrichment and teamwork. From company-wide meetings to team huddles, HUI employees know and understand their customers and how HUI might service them best.

Mintzberg’s Management Roles

While determining the hierarchy of the organization, managers must look at the requirements of different divisions or departments. They must also ensure the harmonization of staff, and try to find out the best way to handle the important tasks and reduce unnecessary expenditure within the company. Management determines the division of work according to its need.

It also has to decide for suitable departments to hand over authority and responsibilities. The following can be steps in organizing function from the perspective of a manager. Leading Managing and leading are not the same activity. Working under this function helps the management control and supervise the actions of the staff.

Some characteristic features of the directing function are as follows. A manager manages employees; this person makes sure that tasks are completed on time and policies are followed. Employees typically follow managers because he or she is the supervisor and in-charge of employees. In an ideal situation, the manager also serves as the leader. Managers who want to lead effectively need to discover what motivates their employees and inspire them to reach the company objectives.

Leading involves the social and informal sources of influence that you use to inspire action taken by others. If managers are effective leaders, their subordinates will be enthusiastic about exerting effort to attain organizational objectives. The behavioral sciences have made many contributions to understanding this function of management. Personality research and studies of job attitudes provide important information as to how managers can most effectively lead subordinates.

Studies of motivation and motivation theory provide important information about the ways in which workers can be energized to put forth productive effort. Studies of communication provide direction as to how managers can effectively and persuasively communicate.

Managers need to pay attention to costs versus performance of the organization. An effective manager will share this information with his or her employees. This builds trust and a feeling of involvement for the employees. Being a manager involves many different tasks. Planning, organizing, leading and controlling are four of the main functions that must be considered in any management position.

Management is a balancing act of many different components and a good manager will be able to maintain the balance and keep employees motivated. Controlling involves ensuring that performance does not deviate from standards. Controlling consists of three steps, which include 1 establishing performance standards, 2 comparing actual performance against standards, and 3 taking corrective action when necessary.

Performance standards are often stated in monetary terms such as revenue, costs, or profits but may also be stated in other terms, such as units produced, number of defective products, or levels of quality or customer service. The measurement of performance can be done in several ways, depending on the performance standards, including financial statements, sales reports, production results, customer satisfaction, and formal performance appraisals.

Managers at all levels engage in the managerial function of controlling to some degree. The managerial function of controlling should not be confused with control in the behavioral or manipulative sense.

Manager Role-Henry Mintzberg’s Management Roles

This function does not imply that managers should attempt to control or to manipulate the personalities, values, attitudes, or emotions of their subordinates. Effective controlling requires the existence of plans, since planning provides the necessary performance standards or objectives.

Controlling also requires a clear understanding of where responsibility for deviations from standards lies. Two traditional control techniques are budget and performance audits. An audit involves an examination and verification of records and supporting documents.

Mintzbergs managerial roles essay topics